Cultivating Self-Worth While in Opiate Addiction Treatment

Feelings of self-worth reflect your understanding of yourself and your sense of personal value. The way that you perceive yourself is developed when you act, and when you think about your actions and how others perceive them. Self-esteem references the value you have for yourself and your general feelings about yourself. It is an all-purpose judgment of yourself.

Studies indicate that low feelings of self-worth are linked to drug use and addiction. In order to best support positive recovery outcomes, it is important for you to increase your self-esteem and cultivate self-worth while in opiate addiction treatment and continue it after.

treatment for opiate addiction

What Research Demonstrates the Relationship Between the Two?

In 2011, a study was published in Addiction Health that positively associated the role of self-esteem with a person’s tendency toward theft, addiction, and prostitution in Kerman City, Iran. The researchers compared people in the central prison of the city with average people and concluded that those who had been charged with drug crimes, theft and prostitution had a much lower level of self-esteem than the ordinary person. They conclude that an increase in self-worth would decrease their tendency towards these negative behaviors. This is something opiate substance abuse treatment can do.

How Does Opiate Addiction Treatment Build Self-Esteem?

Your first major achievement in opiate substance abuse treatment is to stop using substances. This will help you to feel like you are making progress and that will translate into a higher self-worth.

Further, therapists will help you to make 5 changes that will continue the process:

  1. Beneficial decision making
  2. Beneficial boundary setting
  3. Reframing negative thoughts
  4. Working on positive affirmations
  5. Enveloping yourself with positive, sober people

Will It Help Me to Abstain?

Of course, there is more to recovery than improving self-esteem, but doing so will play a role in keeping you sober.

Opiate Addiction Treatment and Genetics; Heredity Doesn’t Mean You Will End Up in Opiate Substance Abuse Treatment but It May Lead to Early Intervention and Prevention at Some Point

When you decide to use drugs, that is a personal choice. It can, of course, be affected by factors like psychology, family, and biology. However, it isn’t until you start using opiates that the risk of developing an addiction or becoming dependent is greatly influenced by genetics. While these genetics are in no way the sole factor that determines these outcomes, the absence or presence of hereditary patterns of addiction can increase your likelihood of needing opiate addiction treatment.

cute meth addiction

Is There Scientific Proof of the Link Between Addiction and Genetics?

There are multiple studies that connect your genes with your drug use. A paper published in Alcohol Research & Health covers “extensive evidence” that genetic components can influence the risk of inheriting a drug or alcohol substance abuse disorder by roughly fifty to sixty percent, this increasing the chances of needing opiate substance abuse treatment.

Any Other Findings?

One of the most well-known studies was the twin study, which used identical twins who shared exactly the same DNA makeup. Its goal was to study the factors contributing to psychiatric disorders. There were higher instances of heritability for dependence in cases of overlap between drug and alcohol dependence. In addition, genes that shape “addictive personality” were found.

These genes determine:

  • Transmission of nerve signals
  • The likelihood of dependence and addiction
  • How opiates, cannabinoids, and alcohol are metabolized

What Impact Does This Body of Research Have?

Presently, genetics can’t point with any degree of accuracy to people who are sure to become addicts. However, this information does point to a time when opiate substance abuse treatment programs can achieve early detection and identify predisposition. This can lead to early intervention and one of the keys to successful recovery is to begin opiate addiction treatment as soon as possible.

How Does the Healthy Environment of an Opiate Substance Abuse Treatment Center Help with Opiate Addiction Treatment?

As time moves forward, more and more information is uncovered about drug abuse and its causes. This information, in turn, contributes to the way that opiate addiction treatment programs  as well as weed user treatment are organized and implemented.

For the last forty years, researchers in the United States have delved into the nature of addiction and sometimes, down the road that information needs to be challenged and new conclusions drawn. A famous study from the 1980’s was reframed and the results of this shift are contributing to the present state of opiate substance abuse treatment.

treating meth addiction

The Rat Experiment

In the 1980s, the Partnership for a Drug Free America—a non-profit presently using the name Partnership for Drug-Free Kids—released an advertisement that became the average person’s drug addiction theory of choice. The experiment that prompted the ad involved researchers placing two bowls of water in a rat cage. One bowl had cocaine and the other did not. Ultimately, 9 of the 10 rats continued to drink from the bowl with cocaine until they became addicted and dies of overdose.

As part of their aim to prevent teenage drug abuse, the Partnership for a Drug-Free America boiled this message and concluded that people, like rats, will use drugs that are made available. This attitude lingered in opiate substance abuse treatment programs.

Reframing the Experiment

In a new approach to the rat experiment’s findings, Researcher Bruce Alexander used a cage that was full of tunnels and toys to occupy the rats and provide them with a healthy social environment. As with the previous study, the two bowls of water (one with cocaine) were made available. In this instance, the rats ignored the cocaine water.

Conclusions

This experiment indicates that animals (including human ones) face less temptation to use drugs when they are positioned in a healthy environment. This is why quality treatment for opiate addiction programs offer a lot of fun and creative features—like yoga, recreational therapy, and art therapy—that keep the mind and body entertained while improving quality of life.

Buddhist 12 Steps

Buddhist 12 Steps

For those who struggle with the concept of God or a Higher Power, the Buddhist 12 Steps might be the perfect solution. Just like other 12 Step fellowships, Buddhism provides a path to transformation in the form of a veritable blue print for a spiritual life.

Many Buddhists find that it helps them to belong to a Buddhist community as well as a 12 Step community – the two complement each other because both call for a spirituality that is based on a practical philosophy of the “here and now” that leads to higher transformation.

Spirituality Not Dogma

Buddhism points out ways to live an enlightened, spiritual life without necessarily believing in God. For this reason some people do not see Buddhism as a religion in the typical, Western sense. Buddhism, rather, is a path of practice and spiritual development; so that practitioners are able transform their lives. In Buddhism, there is no identified Deity, or God. Buddha, himself, is recognized as a great teacher, but never a god. Buddhism and the Buddhist 12 Steps are meant to lead people to their own Buddhahood, or enlightenment. Enlightenment is the state beyond craving and suffering.

The Buddhist 12 Steps:

Buddhist 12 Steps – Step 1: We admitted our addictive craving of alcohol and recognized its consequences in our lives.

Buddhist 12 Steps – Step 2: Came to believe that a power other than self could restore us to wholeness.

Buddhist 12 Steps – Step 3: Made a decision to go for refuge to this other power as we understood it.

Buddhist 12 Steps – Step 4: Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.

Buddhist 12 Steps – Step 5: Admitted to ourselves and another human being the exact moral nature of our past.

Buddhist 12 Steps – Step 6: Became entirely ready to work at transforming ourselves.

Buddhist 12 Steps – Step 7: With the assistance of others and our own firm resolve, we transformed unskillful aspects of ourselves and cultivated positive ones.

Buddhist 12 Steps – Step 8: Made a list of all persons we had harmed.

Buddhist 12 Steps – Step 9: Made direct amends to such people where possible, except when to do so would injure them or others. In addition, made a conscientious effort to forgive all those who harmed us.

Buddhist 12 Steps – Step 10: Continue to maintain awareness of our actions and motives, and when we acted unskillfully promptly admitted it.

Buddhist 12 Steps – Step 11: Engaged through the practice of meditation to improve our conscious contact with our true selves, and seeking that beyond self. Also used prayer as a means to cultivate positive attitudes and states of mind.

Buddhist 12 Steps – Step 12: Having gained spiritual insight as a result of these steps, we practice these principles in all areas of our lives, and make this message available to others in need of recovery.

 

The Buddhist 12 Steps and the Four Noble Truths

It is also possible to look upon the traditional 12 steps as containing the Four Noble Truths and Eightfold Path of Buddhism:

Step 1 = There is suffering

Step 2 = Suffering is caused by cravings

Step 2There is an escape from cravings

Step 3 = The escape from cravings is the noble eightfold path

**The noble eightfold path contains the rest of the steps:

Step 4 = Right view

Steps 5, 6, and 7 = Right intention

Right speech

Steps 8 and 9 =Right action

Right livelihood

Step 10 = Right effort

Step 11 = Right mindfulness

Step 12 = Right concentration

 

The Buddhist 12 Steps and Buddha, Dharma, and Sangha

Buddha refers to both the historical enlightened person and someone’s own potential Buddhahood. Dharma refers to the teaching and Sangha is the spiritual community. The Buddha can be someone’s concept of their Higher Power and Buddha can also represent a trust and faith in your teachers (such as your Sponsor and sober supports). Dharma is the teachings, which can encompass the 12 Steps as well as the other literature used in a 12 Step program. And Sangha, the spiritual community represents the fellowship.

 

 

Sources:

http://www.sasana.org/

http://www.beliefnet.com/

Holistic Non 12 Step

Holistic Non 12 Step

When it comes to combating addiction and alcoholism there is a myriad of options out there on how to do it and what works best. Really, the point of it all though is to find whatever is going to work for you whatever that is. Many people use a 12 step programs to get sober and overcome their addiction and alcoholism. And other people, well they prefer a different approach and this approach is usually labeled as holistic; holistic non 12 step.

Holistic non 12 step is exactly what it sounds like. It is a program to help individuals who are suffering from an addiction or alcoholism stay sober without the use of a 12 step program such as AA or NA. A holistic approach can be very beneficial for anyone who is dealing with addiction and alcoholism because it focuses on the whole rather than just separate parts of the problem. Holistic literally defines into treating the whole meaning treating the physical, mental and spiritual parts of an individual.

So what can you expect from something that holistic non 12 step that will help you to stay sober? Here are just a few of things:

•An abundance of one-on-one, customized therapy each month

•Treatment of the underlying reasons why you are abusing substances, not just the symptoms of addiction itself

•A variety of holistic methods that provide physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual healing

•No requirement to declare yourself as powerless or incurable

Those are just a few of the things. In more detail, the varieties of holistic methods that provide physical, mental, emotional and spiritual healing are all extremely beneficial. Here are some examples of the holistic methods that a holistic non 12 step approach provides:

Acupuncture- Fine needles are inserted at specific points to stimulate, disperse, and regulate the flow of vital energy, and restore a healthy energy balance. In addition to pain relief, acupuncture is also used to improve well-being and treat acute, chronic, and degenerative conditions in children and adults.

 

Aromatherapy- Using “essential oils” distilled from plants, aromatherapy treats emotional disorders such as stress and anxiety as well as a wide range of other ailments. Oils are massaged into the skin in diluted form, inhaled, or placed in baths. Aromatherapy is often used in conjunction with massage therapy, acupuncture, reflexology, herb ology, chiropractic, and other holistic treatments.

Breath work- It is a simple yet powerful technique for self-exploration and healing, based on combined insights from modern consciousness research, depth psychology and perennial spiritual practices. The method activates non-ordinary states of consciousness which mobilize the spontaneous healing potential of the psyche. Sustained effective breathing, evocative music, focused energy work and mandala drawing are components of this subjective journey.

Colon Therapy- The therapeutic goals of colon therapy are to balance body chemistry, eliminate waste, and restore proper tissue and organ function. Colon therapy releases toxins, cleans the blood, stimulates the immune system, and aids in restoring the pH balance in the body. Colon Therapy, also known as colonics, is believed to relieve a wide range of symptoms related to colon dysfunction.

Chiropractic-The chiropractic views the spine as the backbone of human health: misalignments of the vertebrae caused by poor posture or trauma (such as addiction and alcoholism) cause pressure on the spinal nerve roots, leading to diminished function and illness. Through manipulation or adjustment of the spine, treatment seeks to analyze and correct these misalignments

Not only are those holistic non 12 step methods applied but also counseling and psychotherapy, hypnotherapy, hydrotherapy, massage therapy, native American sweat lodges, naturopathic medicine, Reiki, tai-chi, yoga and vitamin therapies.

Through these different methods the holistic non 12 step approach can be just as effective as the 12 step approach. Holistic non 12 step is all about healing from addiction and alcoholism just without the use of 12 steps.

http://www.altmedworld.net/alternative.htm

 

Holistic Remedies for Alcohol Withdrawal

Holistic Remedies for Alcohol Withdrawal

Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome

Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome is the set of symptoms you experience when you reduce or stop drinking cold turkey after binge drinking or long term drinking. Any excessive use of alcohol can lead to tolerance, physical dependence, and alcohol abuse. Alcohol withdrawal syndrome occurs because, once alcohol is no longer in your system, your central nervous system goes into and over-active state. Alcohol withdrawal syndrome may include seizures and delirium tremens and may lead to nerve cell damage and death.

Kindling

Some people who have repeatedly gone through cold turkey withdrawal without tapering off become more and more likely to have bad withdrawals from even small amounts of alcohol. This phenomenon is referred to as “kindling.” The way to avoid kindling is to taper off.

Holistic Drug Treatment

You may not want to go to a traditional drug treatment facility. Take comfort in knowing that there are holistic drug treatment programs that do things a bit differently than typical treatment centers. But, if you are trying a Do-It-Yourself alcohol detox, here are some things to keep in mind:

Taper off Alcohol

It is best not to quit drinking alcohol cold turkey. Alcohol withdrawal is a serious condition. Tapering means to limit your drinking to keep alcohol withdrawal symptoms from starting. Slowly reduce how much you drink; the taper can take anywhere from a couple of days to a week or even longer. It all depends on body chemistry, how much alcohol you’re used to drinking, for how long, and also keep in mind the kindling effect – so if you’ve gone through withdrawals before, this time might be more severe and/or last longer. If, on your first day without alcohol, you start to feel alcohol withdrawal symptoms, then that is a sign that your taper is not done yet.

Holistic Remedies for Alcohol Withdrawal

First, make sure to increase fluid intake when withdrawing from alcohol. Drinking water, alone, is not enough. Be sure to take in electrolytes, too, because an imbalance in these can cause serious problems.

Holistic Remedies for Alcohol Withdrawal #1: Acorn – alcoholic cravings; enlarged spleen and liver

Holistic Remedies for Alcohol Withdrawal#2: Angelica – alcohol cravings; creates aversion to alcohol; relieves gas, bloating, colic, headache; enlarged spleen; anti-inflammatory and antispasmodic.

Holistic Remedies for Alcohol Withdrawal #3: Calanatts – alcohol cravings; restorative for brain, nervous system; relieves gas, cramps, distention; improves appetite and exhaustion

Holistic Remedies for Alcohol Withdrawal #4: Cayenne – stops vomiting; alcohol cravings; improves appetite; reduces irritability, anxiety and tremor; induces calm and sleep; reduces Delirium tremens (the DTs), chills

Holistic Remedies for Alcohol Withdrawal #5: Celandine – liver problems; liver detoxifier; calms emotions (i.e. anger, depression) during withdrawal or cravings; for general sluggishness, difficulty concentrating and mental dullness

Holistic Remedies for Alcohol Withdrawal #6: Hops – sedative that relieves anxiety-related withdrawal symptoms; aids the DTs; helps irritability and restlessness; promotes healthy digestion; relieves insomnia

Home remedies for Alcohol Detox #7: Kudzu – traditional use in China for various side effects of alcohol such as hangover, thirst, gastric bleeding, loss of appetite; alcohol cravings

Holistic Remedies for Alcohol Withdrawal #8: Milk Thistle – protects against damage to the liver by alcohol, drugs and toxins; regenerates damaged liver tissue; essential for cirrhosis; restores proper nerve functioning; eases a racing heart or palpitations.

Holistic Remedies for Alcohol Withdrawal #9: Passionflower – treats insomnia, delirium tremens and muscle spasms; restful sleep

Holistic Remedies for Alcohol Withdrawal #10: Wild Lettuce – produces a general sense of well-being, calms excitability, relieves pain; mild sedative for insomnia

Other Options

If all else fails, consult your doctor who can prescribe certain medications, such as benzodiazepines (benzos like Valium, Xanax, Ativan), to treat your alcohol withdrawal syndrome. These can be taken at home by carefully following his/her instructions. You do not necessarily need to go into a medical   detox facility. However, it might be suggested to you by your doctor to do so. If you find it difficult to see it through, you may want to consider entering a holistic detox treatment program to help you with alcohol withdrawal and alcohol abuse.

 

 

 

Sources:

http://hamsnetwork.org/

http://www.homemademedicine.com

http://en.wikipedia.org/

What is SMART recovery?

What is SMART recovery?

SMART Recovery (Self Management and Recovery Training) is an international non-profit organization which provides assistance to individuals seeking abstinence from addictive behaviors. The approach of smart recovery is secular and science-based using non-confrontational motivational, behavioral and cognitive methods. Meeting participants of smart recovery learn recovery methods derived from evidence-based addiction treatments.

Smart recovery emphasizes four areas which they call the 4-point program in the process of recovery. The 4-point program of smart recovery includes: building motivation, coping with urges, problem solving and lifestyle balance. The smart recovery tools used are various types of therapy including cognitive behavioral therapy. Smart recovery does not use the twelve steps like AA or NA and is actually listed as an alternative to AA and the twelve steps. Even though smart recovery is listed as an alternative it is also suggested as a supplement to a twelve step program.

Smart recovery was incorporated in 1992 as the Alcohol and Drug Abuse Self-Help Network, the organization began operating in 1994. SMART recovery is recognized by the American Academy of Family Physicians, as well as the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) and the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA). NIDA and NIAAA are agencies of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Smart recovery meetings are free for all wishing to attend, and are intended to be informational as well as supportive. Over 800 weekly smart recovery group meetings led by volunteer facilitators are held worldwide.

Smart recovery meetings are also held in correctional facilities in many states including: Arizona, California, Florida, Indiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin.

In smart recovery there are stages of change, seven of them and these changes are essentially how the smart recovery program works.

  • Stage one of smart recovery change: pre-contemplation: at this stage of smart recovery the participant may not realize that they have a problem.
  • Stage two of smart recovery change: contemplation: the participant of smart recovery evaluates the advantages and disadvantages of the addiction by performing a cost/benefit analysis.
  • Stage three of smart recovery change: determination and preparation: the participant completes a change plan worksheet.
  • Stage four of smart recovery change: action: The participant in smart recovery begins to seek out new ways of handling their addictive behavior. This can include self-help, the support of addiction help groups or professional guidance from a counselor etc.
  • Stage five of smart recovery change: maintenance: At this stage a few months of smart recovery have gone by and the participant in smart recovery’s behavior has been changed and now seeks to maintain their gains.
  • Stage six of smart recovery: Relapse: although it is not inevitable, relapses even in smart recovery are normal and part of the change cycle and if they are handled well can serve as a learning experience in overcoming addiction.
  • Stage seven of smart recovery change: termination: once the participant in smart recovery has sustained a long period of change they may choose to move on with their lives and graduate from smart recovery.

Non 12 Step Rehabs

Non 12 Step Rehabs

Non 12 Step Rehabs are treatment programs that employ other approaches and techniques to treating substance abuse and addiction, instead of the 12 Step approach.

The 12 Step approach, also called the Disease Model, has long contended the maladaptive patterns of alcohol and substance use displayed by addicted individuals are the result of a lifelong disease that is biological in origin. This perspective renders the alcoholic and/or addict essentially powerless over their problematic behaviors and unable to remain sober without the use of a spiritual program that places their problem in a Higher Power, much like someone with a terminal illness are unable to fight the disease by themselves without medication. Behavioral treatment, therefore, necessarily requires individuals to admit their addiction, renounce their former lifestyle, and seek a supportive social network who can help them remain sober. Such approaches are the features of Twelve-step programs, originally published in the book Alcoholics Anonymous in 1939.

Non 12 Step Rehabs apply different approaches such as:

Non 12 Step Rehabs: Person-Centered Therapy (PCT)

PCT is a form of talk-psychotherapy. The goal of PCT is to provide clients with an opportunity to develop a sense of self wherein they can realize how their attitudes, feelings and behavior are being negatively affected and make an effort to find their true positive potential. In this technique, therapists create a comfortable, non-judgmental environment by demonstrating congruence (genuineness), empathy, and unconditional positive regard toward their clients while using a non-directive approach. This aids clients in finding their own solutions to their problems.

Non 12 Step Rehabs: the Cognitive Models of Addiction Recovery

  • Relapse prevention

Four psychosocial processes relevant to the addiction and relapse processes: self-efficacy, outcome expectancies, attributions of causality, and decision-making processes. Self-efficacy refers to one’s ability to deal competently and effectively with high-risk, relapse-provoking situations. Finally, decision-making processes are implicated in the relapse process as well. Substance use is the result of multiple decisions whose collective effects result in consumption of the intoxicant.

  • Cognitive therapy of substance abuse

This therapy rests upon the assumption addicted individuals possess core beliefs, often not accessible to immediate consciousness. The cognitive therapist’s job is to uncover this underlying system of beliefs, analyze it with the patient, and thereby demonstrate its dysfunctionality.

  • Emotion regulation, mindfulness and substance abuse

Emotion regulation in the treatment of substance abuse; mindfulness based approaches

Non 12 Step Rehabs: Behavioral Models

Behavioral therapy lays much emphasis on the use of problem solving techniques as a means of helping the addict to overcome his addiction.

Non 12 Step Rehabs: Holistic Drug Treatment Approach

The perspective of a holistic drug rehab is similar to that of a 12 step rehab: that alcoholism and addiction are a physical, spiritual, and psychological disease, meaning it pertains to the body and the mind. This approach differs from a 12 Step rehab in that it offers many holistic practices to improve spiritual as well as physical and mental health and may include but does not necessarily include the 12 Steps. A few of the practices that are included in holistic drug treatment are but are not limited to:

  • Aromatherapy
  • Ayurveda medicine
  • Natural diet
  • Exercise
  • Counseling
  • Herbal remedies
  • Homeopathy
  • Acupuncture
  • Bodywork
  • Energy-based therapies
  • Prayerful intention

 

 

 

 

Sources:

https://en.wikipedia.org

http://www.nrepp.samhsa.gov

Holistic drug treatment in the tri-state area

Holistic drug treatment in the tri-state area

The tri-state area consists of New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania, the tri-state area, are home to some of the most urban and forward thinking cities on the face of the earth. This tri-state area is also home to many alcoholics and addicts. Luckily there is help available in the form of holistic drug treatment, even in places where it seems like drug use runs rampant. And holistic drug treatment in the tri-State area is extremely beneficial for addicts and alcoholics.

Most people don’t understand exactly what the word holistic means. They usually know what kind of practices are under the category of holistic such as acupuncture or yoga. They don’t really know why these are called holistic though. Holistic by the book definition in medical terms is relating to the medical consideration of the whole person, physically and psychologically in the treatment of a disease. It’s a wellness approach that addresses the body, mind and spirit or the physical, emotional/mental and spiritual aspects of an individual. Holistic treatment in the tri-state area is therefore focused on our entire beings and not just the physical or mental, but the entire make up of who we are. So for those of with the disease of alcoholism and addiction, holistic drug treatment in the tri-state area is almost essential to our overall health. Alcoholism is a physical, spiritual, and psychological disease, meaning it pertains to the body and the mind. So a holistic approach that tackles the human being as a whole instead of parts really benefits us.

 

Holistic drug treatment in the tri-state area usually offers many holistic practices to improve spiritual as well as physical and mental health. A few of the practices that holistic drug treatment in the tri-state area makes available are:

  • aromatherapy
  • Ayurveda medicine
  • natural diet
  • exercise
  • counseling
  • herbal remedies
  • homeopathy
  • acupuncture
  • naturopathic medicine
  • bodywork
  • energy-based therapies
  • prayerful intention
  • Chinese medicine

 

These are just a few of the practices that make up a holistic drug treatment in the tri-state area. All of these things help to empower the mind, body and spirit. The spiritual aspect is the most important to me. I know for myself holistic drug treatment was exactly what I needed. I didn’t go to holistic drug treatment in the tri-state area, I went to holistic drug treatment in Florida but regardless, what I needed was that misery inside my soul to be removed. I needed to recover from a pain so deep and I didn’t know how. Holistic drug treatment in the tri-state area made that possible.

In fact I still use many of those holistic practices mentioned above in my life today. It helps to keep my soul in fit spiritual condition. As long as I am in fit spiritual condition my alcoholism is arrested and I no longer feel the need or want to drink or use drugs regardless of whether or not I am in the tri-state area or not. Everything about this program and staying clean has been of a holistic nature. Holistic drug treatment in the tri-state area helps to get down to the root of what the problem is; a spiritual malady is the problem. Not to say we were in great physical or mental health either, but you need something special to feed the spiritual side. That’s why holistic practices are so remarkable. Holistic drug treatment in the tri-state area seems to especially understand this. That’s why they incorporate the type of healing they do into their programs. Holistic drug treatment in the tri-state area is what can allow you and what allowed me to not only get physical health by soulful health.

 

 

Holistic Drug Treatment vs. Alternative Drug Treatment

Holistic Drug Treatment vs. Alternative Drug Treatment

 

What is Holistic Drug Treatment?

Holistic drug rehab is centered on the belief that individuals battling addiction are people who need and deserve treatment for their entire being, not just their dependence.

First to know what to look for in a holistic drug rehab center you must know the definition of holistic and what kind of practices are under that definition. Holistic means to treat the whole instead of the parts. Holistic practices are those that treat an entire mind, body and spirit. Knowing this holistic drug rehab centers offer things such as; acupuncture, yoga, meditation, aromatherapy, equine therapy, and tai-chi. All of these are holistic practices because they treat the body’s mental, physical and spiritual functions.

Spirituality plays a role in recovery. Clients often turned to substances in order to fill an empty hole. The temporary effects of being high or drunk can make that feeling go away for a bit, but eventually return. The spiritual component to holistic drug rehabilitation can help manifest in clients a new sense of purpose.

One of the ways that holistic drug treatment facilities attempt to attend to the whole person and to individualize care is by providing such alternative treatments—including acupuncture, energy psychology, equine-assisted therapy, neurofeedback, psychodrama, Reiki, somatic experiencing, and massage therapy.

Often times, holistic drug treatment programs are based on a 12 Step program philosophy, which recognizes the importance of having a spiritual foundation in order to begin recovery from addiction.

Holistic Drug Treatment vs. Alternative Drug Treatment

Although they are used interchangeably, alternative drug treatment typically means drug treatment that is wholly different from other modalities of addiction treatment. Holistic programs may offer “alternative” medicine and techniques such as yoga, meditation, acupuncture, and so on. Alternative drug treatment does not promote the 12 Step program philosophies, which recognizes addiction as a combination of physical allergy, mental obsession, and spiritual malady. Alternative drug treatment takes a different approach and seemingly identifies only one or two of these on which to focus.

For example, Narconon is an alternative drug treatment program that consists of six elements: exercise, sauna, supplements, sufficient liquids, regular diet with fresh vegetables, and adequate sleep. It employs courses or “training routines” (TRs) that supposedly rehabilitate drug abusers.

Another alternative drug treatment facility boasts a program of moderation. The approach is to teach clients how to acquire feelings of joy or satisfaction from the more typical activities of life. The goal is not necessarily to have clients stop their drug(s) of choice and/or addictive behavior 100% as is the approach of the 12 Steps and those who treat addiction only as a brain disease.

 

Its program states that it is unlike 12 Step recovery because it offers a wide range of “goal options” specific to the addictive behavior. Each goal requires a different strategy and results in a different outcome regarding the substance or behavior of your concern, from complete abstinence to solely abstinent from the drug(s) of choice, to moderation of the “problem” drug, to reduction of problem behavior to a “less harmful state.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:

http://www.psychologytoday.com

http://addictionalternatives.com

www.wikipedia.org

 

Holistic Remedies for Opiate Withdrawal

Holistic Remedies for Opiate Withdrawal

Holistic remedies for opiate withdrawalIf we are honest about opiate withdrawal, thinking about using a holistic remedy to help is not only scary but seemingly unrealistic. But using anything can sometimes be better than using nothing. This is especially true for a person who can afford or doesn’t want to go to an opiate detox or opiate rehab. Thankfully, there are holistic remedies for opiate withdrawal that don’t have to include an inpatient opiate detox or that are incorporated into an inpatient opiate detox.

Here are some holistic remedies for opiate withdrawal:

Take a bath or soak in a hot tub

Baths, hot tubs, and showers are great holistic remedies for opiate withdrawal. Hot ater is a good temporary holistic remedy for acute opiate withdrawal symptoms. Hot water can relieve tension and discomfort. Taking a bath also works to help with insomnia.

Get sun or go tan

When you are lying around experience opiate withdrawal, getting in some sunshine can help. A great holistic remedy for opiate withdrawal is laying in the backyard, deck, or patio. The sun will be great for getting vitamin D which most people are deficient in. Strong bright light also produces serotonin which can improve your mood and help you sleep.

Eat an alkaline heavy diet

Alkaline heavy diet means whole foods, grains, veggies and fruits. Diet and nutrition always makes for great holistic remedies for opiate withdrawal. Most people who abuse opiates are in terrible shape physically due to bad eating habits or not eating at all. If you can, eat healthy veggies, fruits and whole grains as well as chicken and you will find that your health problems begin to improve and heal.

Get a massage

Massages are one of the most amazing holistic remedies for opiate withdrawal. Not a lot of things feel much better than a massage when you are going through a detox from opiates. Massages get deep into your muscle tissue and can release tightness, muscle aches, back spasms, and pain. Stay hydrated as well if you are using massages at one of your holistic remedies for opiate withdrawal.

Take Vitamins and Minerals

Taking opiates causes 2 to 10 times the normal amount of dopamine to be released in your brain and dopamine is your body’s natural reward system. When you stop taking opiates your body doesn’t produce as much dopamine. Taking vitamins and minerals can help your body to start creating dopamine as well as serotonin again. Vitamins and minerals are a great holistic remedy for opiate withdrawal because they can help you recover quickly and feel better quickly.

Meditation

Meditation is one of the best holistic remedies for opiate withdrawal when your mind feels crazy. Meditation has long been known to offer a wide range of health benefits such as improved self-control, greater awareness, and greater immunity. The problem with meditation is choosing to do it. The process is sometime is difficult, and clumsy at first. If you want you can find guided audio meditations to help relieve your opiate withdrawal symptoms with holistic remedies.

http://www.opiate-freedom-center.com/getting-help/top-10-opiate-withdrawal-home-remedies/

 

 

How do holistic drug treatment centers work?

 

holistic drug treatment center

Holistic health is a concept in medicine that views all aspects of a person’s needs including psychological, physical, and social and asserts the importance that all of these be taken into account when treating a patient. Often synonymous with the term alternative medicine, this approach claims that disease, in this case addiction, is a result of physical, emotional, spiritual, social and/or environmental imbalance.

Holistic drug treatment centers take this approach because it is in line with the working definition of addiction, which is perceived to be a three-fold disease: it is a spiritual malady, a physical allergy, and a mental obsession. In other words, addiction afflicts the body, mind, and spirit.

So, what are holistic drug treatment centers?

In the field of drug addiction treatment, holistic drug treatment centers often offer much of the same services as typical treatment centers however, in addition to this, they offer a wider variety of ancient and cutting-edge techniques for healing the individual who suffers from drug addiction. And thus, Holistic drug treatment centers provide treatment approaches that address each “part” that make up the “whole” of the individual.

Physical allergy: Substance abuse in alcoholics and addicts is more than a physical dependence; it is an actual physical allergy. When a true alcoholic or addict introduces a chemical substance into their system, it causes a chain reaction in their brain that initiates a cycle of drug use and abuse patterns that cannot be broken by sheer willpower.

Methods for addressing the physical symptoms:

Holistic drug treatment centers incorporate the use of medication along with offering yoga and exercise classes; beach outings; fishing; sports such as golfing and volleyball; nutrition support; vitamin therapy; acupuncture; chiropractic treatment; Native American sweat lodges; spa treatments; steam rooms and saunas.

Mental obsession: Addiction involves mental aspects. Even when alcoholics and addicts want to stop using, they experience obsessive thoughts about their drug(s) of choice. This obsession is extremely strong and impossible to ignore.

Methods for addressing mental obsession:

Holistic drug treatment centers offer meditation; different types of therapy such as: one-on-one and group psychotherapy (talk therapy); hypnotherapy; Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR); cognitive; behavioral; journaling, music therapy; massage therapy.

Spiritual malady: Alcoholics and addicts often use drugs in order to fill a perceived void that they experience. Holistic drug treatment centers identify this “void” as a lack of spirituality.

Methods for addressing spiritual malady:

Holistic drug treatment centers promote attending 12 Step meetings which speak to the need of having a spiritual foundation and encourage finding one’s own spirituality; yoga and meditation (which also address spiritual needs); Native American sweat lodges (addresses both physical cleansing and spirituality).

Holistic drug treatment centers focus on treating the individual as a whole and identify the importance of having a well-rounded program of recovery. The techniques and methods they use are geared towards having lasting effects for overall success in recovery. As well, they promote the formation of new, healthy habits and instill in patients the ways in which they can continue to implement them in their lives going forward from treatment.

How To Find A Holistic Doctor

Sources:

www.wikipedia.org

www.holisticdrugrehab.com