Holistic drug treatment in the tri-state area

Holistic drug treatment in the tri-state area

The tri-state area consists of New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania, the tri-state area, are home to some of the most urban and forward thinking cities on the face of the earth. This tri-state area is also home to many alcoholics and addicts. Luckily there is help available in the form of holistic drug treatment, even in places where it seems like drug use runs rampant. And holistic drug treatment in the tri-State area is extremely beneficial for addicts and alcoholics.

Most people don’t understand exactly what the word holistic means. They usually know what kind of practices are under the category of holistic such as acupuncture or yoga. They don’t really know why these are called holistic though. Holistic by the book definition in medical terms is relating to the medical consideration of the whole person, physically and psychologically in the treatment of a disease. It’s a wellness approach that addresses the body, mind and spirit or the physical, emotional/mental and spiritual aspects of an individual. Holistic treatment in the tri-state area is therefore focused on our entire beings and not just the physical or mental, but the entire make up of who we are. So for those of with the disease of alcoholism and addiction, holistic drug treatment in the tri-state area is almost essential to our overall health. Alcoholism is a physical, spiritual, and psychological disease, meaning it pertains to the body and the mind. So a holistic approach that tackles the human being as a whole instead of parts really benefits us.

 

Holistic drug treatment in the tri-state area usually offers many holistic practices to improve spiritual as well as physical and mental health. A few of the practices that holistic drug treatment in the tri-state area makes available are:

  • aromatherapy
  • Ayurveda medicine
  • natural diet
  • exercise
  • counseling
  • herbal remedies
  • homeopathy
  • acupuncture
  • naturopathic medicine
  • bodywork
  • energy-based therapies
  • prayerful intention
  • Chinese medicine

 

These are just a few of the practices that make up a holistic drug treatment in the tri-state area. All of these things help to empower the mind, body and spirit. The spiritual aspect is the most important to me. I know for myself holistic drug treatment was exactly what I needed. I didn’t go to holistic drug treatment in the tri-state area, I went to holistic drug treatment in Florida but regardless, what I needed was that misery inside my soul to be removed. I needed to recover from a pain so deep and I didn’t know how. Holistic drug treatment in the tri-state area made that possible.

In fact I still use many of those holistic practices mentioned above in my life today. It helps to keep my soul in fit spiritual condition. As long as I am in fit spiritual condition my alcoholism is arrested and I no longer feel the need or want to drink or use drugs regardless of whether or not I am in the tri-state area or not. Everything about this program and staying clean has been of a holistic nature. Holistic drug treatment in the tri-state area helps to get down to the root of what the problem is; a spiritual malady is the problem. Not to say we were in great physical or mental health either, but you need something special to feed the spiritual side. That’s why holistic practices are so remarkable. Holistic drug treatment in the tri-state area seems to especially understand this. That’s why they incorporate the type of healing they do into their programs. Holistic drug treatment in the tri-state area is what can allow you and what allowed me to not only get physical health by soulful health.

 

 

Holistic Drug Treatment vs. Alternative Drug Treatment

Holistic Drug Treatment vs. Alternative Drug Treatment

 

What is Holistic Drug Treatment?

Holistic drug rehab is centered on the belief that individuals battling addiction are people who need and deserve treatment for their entire being, not just their dependence.

First to know what to look for in a holistic drug rehab center you must know the definition of holistic and what kind of practices are under that definition. Holistic means to treat the whole instead of the parts. Holistic practices are those that treat an entire mind, body and spirit. Knowing this holistic drug rehab centers offer things such as; acupuncture, yoga, meditation, aromatherapy, equine therapy, and tai-chi. All of these are holistic practices because they treat the body’s mental, physical and spiritual functions.

Spirituality plays a role in recovery. Clients often turned to substances in order to fill an empty hole. The temporary effects of being high or drunk can make that feeling go away for a bit, but eventually return. The spiritual component to holistic drug rehabilitation can help manifest in clients a new sense of purpose.

One of the ways that holistic drug treatment facilities attempt to attend to the whole person and to individualize care is by providing such alternative treatments—including acupuncture, energy psychology, equine-assisted therapy, neurofeedback, psychodrama, Reiki, somatic experiencing, and massage therapy.

Often times, holistic drug treatment programs are based on a 12 Step program philosophy, which recognizes the importance of having a spiritual foundation in order to begin recovery from addiction.

Holistic Drug Treatment vs. Alternative Drug Treatment

Although they are used interchangeably, alternative drug treatment typically means drug treatment that is wholly different from other modalities of addiction treatment. Holistic programs may offer “alternative” medicine and techniques such as yoga, meditation, acupuncture, and so on. Alternative drug treatment does not promote the 12 Step program philosophies, which recognizes addiction as a combination of physical allergy, mental obsession, and spiritual malady. Alternative drug treatment takes a different approach and seemingly identifies only one or two of these on which to focus.

For example, Narconon is an alternative drug treatment program that consists of six elements: exercise, sauna, supplements, sufficient liquids, regular diet with fresh vegetables, and adequate sleep. It employs courses or “training routines” (TRs) that supposedly rehabilitate drug abusers.

Another alternative drug treatment facility boasts a program of moderation. The approach is to teach clients how to acquire feelings of joy or satisfaction from the more typical activities of life. The goal is not necessarily to have clients stop their drug(s) of choice and/or addictive behavior 100% as is the approach of the 12 Steps and those who treat addiction only as a brain disease.

 

Its program states that it is unlike 12 Step recovery because it offers a wide range of “goal options” specific to the addictive behavior. Each goal requires a different strategy and results in a different outcome regarding the substance or behavior of your concern, from complete abstinence to solely abstinent from the drug(s) of choice, to moderation of the “problem” drug, to reduction of problem behavior to a “less harmful state.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:

http://www.psychologytoday.com

http://addictionalternatives.com

www.wikipedia.org

 

The Effects of Alcohol on Fitness

The Effects of Alcohol on Fitness

The Effects of Alcohol on Fitness

As we head into spring, the days are getting warmer, the clothes skimpier, and many of us are heading to the gym to get in shape. And while a cold beer after a hard workout may sound enticing, you may want to consider the effects of alcohol on fitness before you indulge. Alcohol consumption, even moderately, can reverse all the work you just put in at the gym.

The Effects of Alcohol on Fitness: Athletic Performance

Athletic performance requires coordination and cognitive precision, so your ability to exercise and play sports can be negatively affected by alcohol. Alcohol impairs reaction time, balance, and hand eye coordination.

In addition, alcohol acts as a diuretic, which means it increases the speed at which fluids and electrolytes leave the body. This can impair the body’s ability to stay hydrated, especially while working out. Alcohol also increases the production of lactic acid-causing and increase in muscle soreness, and can dilate blood vessels which increases sweating and causes further dehydration.

The Effects of Alcohol on Fitness: Weight Gain

Alcohol contains what nutritionists call “empty calories.” This means that one of the effects of alcohol on fitness is that it contains a lot of calories with no nutritional value. Also, alcohol consumption increases belly fat.  Experts recommend that you limit your intake to one drink a day and keep an eye on overall caloric intake.

The Effects of Alcohol on Fitness: Muscles

One of the most negative effects of alcohol on fitness is the way that it inhibits muscle growth. Protein synthesis is the main way that the body builds muscle. It is the growth process within muscle cells. Drinking alcohol can inhibit this process. Excessive alcohol consumption slows the growth process down by up to 20%.

Another major way that alcohol affects muscle growth is that it affects the release growth hormone. Growth hormone plays a role in building muscle, stimulating cell growth, and promoting bone growth. When this hormone is low, it’s going to affect muscle growth. Growth hormone is usually secreted during sleep, and since alcohol can disrupt natural sleep, growth hormone production can be inhibited up to 70%.

Binge drinking can also cause a drop in testosterone levels while increasing cortisol, a hormone that destroys muscle. Avoid drinking alcohol right before or after hitting the gym.

The Effects of Alcohol on Fitness: Heart Health

Many people have heard that drinking alcohol can be good for your heart, but it must be pointed out that these health benefits extend only to moderate drinking (one to two drinks a day). Once drinking passes that point, alcohol can actually damage your health.  And keep in mind that the positive benefits of moderate alcohol consumption likely only apply to people who are 45 and older.

Overall, if you are looking to get fit this spring, its best to limit yourself to moderate drinking or cut out alcohol altogether. Most of the effects of alcohol on fitness are negative, and they can counteract the good things you are doing for your health like exercising and eating right.

Sources:

http://www.livestrong.com/article/345415-the-effects-of-alcohol-on-fitness/