Buddhist 12 Steps

Buddhist 12 Steps

For those who struggle with the concept of God or a Higher Power, the Buddhist 12 Steps might be the perfect solution. Just like other 12 Step fellowships, Buddhism provides a path to transformation in the form of a veritable blue print for a spiritual life.

Many Buddhists find that it helps them to belong to a Buddhist community as well as a 12 Step community – the two complement each other because both call for a spirituality that is based on a practical philosophy of the “here and now” that leads to higher transformation.

Spirituality Not Dogma

Buddhism points out ways to live an enlightened, spiritual life without necessarily believing in God. For this reason some people do not see Buddhism as a religion in the typical, Western sense. Buddhism, rather, is a path of practice and spiritual development; so that practitioners are able transform their lives. In Buddhism, there is no identified Deity, or God. Buddha, himself, is recognized as a great teacher, but never a god. Buddhism and the Buddhist 12 Steps are meant to lead people to their own Buddhahood, or enlightenment. Enlightenment is the state beyond craving and suffering.

The Buddhist 12 Steps:

Buddhist 12 Steps – Step 1: We admitted our addictive craving of alcohol and recognized its consequences in our lives.

Buddhist 12 Steps – Step 2: Came to believe that a power other than self could restore us to wholeness.

Buddhist 12 Steps – Step 3: Made a decision to go for refuge to this other power as we understood it.

Buddhist 12 Steps – Step 4: Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.

Buddhist 12 Steps – Step 5: Admitted to ourselves and another human being the exact moral nature of our past.

Buddhist 12 Steps – Step 6: Became entirely ready to work at transforming ourselves.

Buddhist 12 Steps – Step 7: With the assistance of others and our own firm resolve, we transformed unskillful aspects of ourselves and cultivated positive ones.

Buddhist 12 Steps – Step 8: Made a list of all persons we had harmed.

Buddhist 12 Steps – Step 9: Made direct amends to such people where possible, except when to do so would injure them or others. In addition, made a conscientious effort to forgive all those who harmed us.

Buddhist 12 Steps – Step 10: Continue to maintain awareness of our actions and motives, and when we acted unskillfully promptly admitted it.

Buddhist 12 Steps – Step 11: Engaged through the practice of meditation to improve our conscious contact with our true selves, and seeking that beyond self. Also used prayer as a means to cultivate positive attitudes and states of mind.

Buddhist 12 Steps – Step 12: Having gained spiritual insight as a result of these steps, we practice these principles in all areas of our lives, and make this message available to others in need of recovery.

 

The Buddhist 12 Steps and the Four Noble Truths

It is also possible to look upon the traditional 12 steps as containing the Four Noble Truths and Eightfold Path of Buddhism:

Step 1 = There is suffering

Step 2 = Suffering is caused by cravings

Step 2There is an escape from cravings

Step 3 = The escape from cravings is the noble eightfold path

**The noble eightfold path contains the rest of the steps:

Step 4 = Right view

Steps 5, 6, and 7 = Right intention

Right speech

Steps 8 and 9 =Right action

Right livelihood

Step 10 = Right effort

Step 11 = Right mindfulness

Step 12 = Right concentration

 

The Buddhist 12 Steps and Buddha, Dharma, and Sangha

Buddha refers to both the historical enlightened person and someone’s own potential Buddhahood. Dharma refers to the teaching and Sangha is the spiritual community. The Buddha can be someone’s concept of their Higher Power and Buddha can also represent a trust and faith in your teachers (such as your Sponsor and sober supports). Dharma is the teachings, which can encompass the 12 Steps as well as the other literature used in a 12 Step program. And Sangha, the spiritual community represents the fellowship.

 

 

Sources:

http://www.sasana.org/

http://www.beliefnet.com/

Non 12 Step Rehabs

Non 12 Step Rehabs

Non 12 Step Rehabs are treatment programs that employ other approaches and techniques to treating substance abuse and addiction, instead of the 12 Step approach.

The 12 Step approach, also called the Disease Model, has long contended the maladaptive patterns of alcohol and substance use displayed by addicted individuals are the result of a lifelong disease that is biological in origin. This perspective renders the alcoholic and/or addict essentially powerless over their problematic behaviors and unable to remain sober without the use of a spiritual program that places their problem in a Higher Power, much like someone with a terminal illness are unable to fight the disease by themselves without medication. Behavioral treatment, therefore, necessarily requires individuals to admit their addiction, renounce their former lifestyle, and seek a supportive social network who can help them remain sober. Such approaches are the features of Twelve-step programs, originally published in the book Alcoholics Anonymous in 1939.

Non 12 Step Rehabs apply different approaches such as:

Non 12 Step Rehabs: Person-Centered Therapy (PCT)

PCT is a form of talk-psychotherapy. The goal of PCT is to provide clients with an opportunity to develop a sense of self wherein they can realize how their attitudes, feelings and behavior are being negatively affected and make an effort to find their true positive potential. In this technique, therapists create a comfortable, non-judgmental environment by demonstrating congruence (genuineness), empathy, and unconditional positive regard toward their clients while using a non-directive approach. This aids clients in finding their own solutions to their problems.

Non 12 Step Rehabs: the Cognitive Models of Addiction Recovery

  • Relapse prevention

Four psychosocial processes relevant to the addiction and relapse processes: self-efficacy, outcome expectancies, attributions of causality, and decision-making processes. Self-efficacy refers to one’s ability to deal competently and effectively with high-risk, relapse-provoking situations. Finally, decision-making processes are implicated in the relapse process as well. Substance use is the result of multiple decisions whose collective effects result in consumption of the intoxicant.

  • Cognitive therapy of substance abuse

This therapy rests upon the assumption addicted individuals possess core beliefs, often not accessible to immediate consciousness. The cognitive therapist’s job is to uncover this underlying system of beliefs, analyze it with the patient, and thereby demonstrate its dysfunctionality.

  • Emotion regulation, mindfulness and substance abuse

Emotion regulation in the treatment of substance abuse; mindfulness based approaches

Non 12 Step Rehabs: Behavioral Models

Behavioral therapy lays much emphasis on the use of problem solving techniques as a means of helping the addict to overcome his addiction.

Non 12 Step Rehabs: Holistic Drug Treatment Approach

The perspective of a holistic drug rehab is similar to that of a 12 step rehab: that alcoholism and addiction are a physical, spiritual, and psychological disease, meaning it pertains to the body and the mind. This approach differs from a 12 Step rehab in that it offers many holistic practices to improve spiritual as well as physical and mental health and may include but does not necessarily include the 12 Steps. A few of the practices that are included in holistic drug treatment are but are not limited to:

  • Aromatherapy
  • Ayurveda medicine
  • Natural diet
  • Exercise
  • Counseling
  • Herbal remedies
  • Homeopathy
  • Acupuncture
  • Bodywork
  • Energy-based therapies
  • Prayerful intention

 

 

 

 

Sources:

https://en.wikipedia.org

http://www.nrepp.samhsa.gov

Holistic Drug Treatment vs. Alternative Drug Treatment

Holistic Drug Treatment vs. Alternative Drug Treatment

 

What is Holistic Drug Treatment?

Holistic drug rehab is centered on the belief that individuals battling addiction are people who need and deserve treatment for their entire being, not just their dependence.

First to know what to look for in a holistic drug rehab center you must know the definition of holistic and what kind of practices are under that definition. Holistic means to treat the whole instead of the parts. Holistic practices are those that treat an entire mind, body and spirit. Knowing this holistic drug rehab centers offer things such as; acupuncture, yoga, meditation, aromatherapy, equine therapy, and tai-chi. All of these are holistic practices because they treat the body’s mental, physical and spiritual functions.

Spirituality plays a role in recovery. Clients often turned to substances in order to fill an empty hole. The temporary effects of being high or drunk can make that feeling go away for a bit, but eventually return. The spiritual component to holistic drug rehabilitation can help manifest in clients a new sense of purpose.

One of the ways that holistic drug treatment facilities attempt to attend to the whole person and to individualize care is by providing such alternative treatments—including acupuncture, energy psychology, equine-assisted therapy, neurofeedback, psychodrama, Reiki, somatic experiencing, and massage therapy.

Often times, holistic drug treatment programs are based on a 12 Step program philosophy, which recognizes the importance of having a spiritual foundation in order to begin recovery from addiction.

Holistic Drug Treatment vs. Alternative Drug Treatment

Although they are used interchangeably, alternative drug treatment typically means drug treatment that is wholly different from other modalities of addiction treatment. Holistic programs may offer “alternative” medicine and techniques such as yoga, meditation, acupuncture, and so on. Alternative drug treatment does not promote the 12 Step program philosophies, which recognizes addiction as a combination of physical allergy, mental obsession, and spiritual malady. Alternative drug treatment takes a different approach and seemingly identifies only one or two of these on which to focus.

For example, Narconon is an alternative drug treatment program that consists of six elements: exercise, sauna, supplements, sufficient liquids, regular diet with fresh vegetables, and adequate sleep. It employs courses or “training routines” (TRs) that supposedly rehabilitate drug abusers.

Another alternative drug treatment facility boasts a program of moderation. The approach is to teach clients how to acquire feelings of joy or satisfaction from the more typical activities of life. The goal is not necessarily to have clients stop their drug(s) of choice and/or addictive behavior 100% as is the approach of the 12 Steps and those who treat addiction only as a brain disease.

 

Its program states that it is unlike 12 Step recovery because it offers a wide range of “goal options” specific to the addictive behavior. Each goal requires a different strategy and results in a different outcome regarding the substance or behavior of your concern, from complete abstinence to solely abstinent from the drug(s) of choice, to moderation of the “problem” drug, to reduction of problem behavior to a “less harmful state.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:

http://www.psychologytoday.com

http://addictionalternatives.com

www.wikipedia.org

 

How do holistic drug treatment centers work?

 

holistic drug treatment center

Holistic health is a concept in medicine that views all aspects of a person’s needs including psychological, physical, and social and asserts the importance that all of these be taken into account when treating a patient. Often synonymous with the term alternative medicine, this approach claims that disease, in this case addiction, is a result of physical, emotional, spiritual, social and/or environmental imbalance.

Holistic drug treatment centers take this approach because it is in line with the working definition of addiction, which is perceived to be a three-fold disease: it is a spiritual malady, a physical allergy, and a mental obsession. In other words, addiction afflicts the body, mind, and spirit.

So, what are holistic drug treatment centers?

In the field of drug addiction treatment, holistic drug treatment centers often offer much of the same services as typical treatment centers however, in addition to this, they offer a wider variety of ancient and cutting-edge techniques for healing the individual who suffers from drug addiction. And thus, Holistic drug treatment centers provide treatment approaches that address each “part” that make up the “whole” of the individual.

Physical allergy: Substance abuse in alcoholics and addicts is more than a physical dependence; it is an actual physical allergy. When a true alcoholic or addict introduces a chemical substance into their system, it causes a chain reaction in their brain that initiates a cycle of drug use and abuse patterns that cannot be broken by sheer willpower.

Methods for addressing the physical symptoms:

Holistic drug treatment centers incorporate the use of medication along with offering yoga and exercise classes; beach outings; fishing; sports such as golfing and volleyball; nutrition support; vitamin therapy; acupuncture; chiropractic treatment; Native American sweat lodges; spa treatments; steam rooms and saunas.

Mental obsession: Addiction involves mental aspects. Even when alcoholics and addicts want to stop using, they experience obsessive thoughts about their drug(s) of choice. This obsession is extremely strong and impossible to ignore.

Methods for addressing mental obsession:

Holistic drug treatment centers offer meditation; different types of therapy such as: one-on-one and group psychotherapy (talk therapy); hypnotherapy; Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR); cognitive; behavioral; journaling, music therapy; massage therapy.

Spiritual malady: Alcoholics and addicts often use drugs in order to fill a perceived void that they experience. Holistic drug treatment centers identify this “void” as a lack of spirituality.

Methods for addressing spiritual malady:

Holistic drug treatment centers promote attending 12 Step meetings which speak to the need of having a spiritual foundation and encourage finding one’s own spirituality; yoga and meditation (which also address spiritual needs); Native American sweat lodges (addresses both physical cleansing and spirituality).

Holistic drug treatment centers focus on treating the individual as a whole and identify the importance of having a well-rounded program of recovery. The techniques and methods they use are geared towards having lasting effects for overall success in recovery. As well, they promote the formation of new, healthy habits and instill in patients the ways in which they can continue to implement them in their lives going forward from treatment.

How To Find A Holistic Doctor

Sources:

www.wikipedia.org

www.holisticdrugrehab.com

What’s going to happen on 12/21/12?

What's going to happen on 12/21/12?

What’s going to happen on 12/21/12?

2012 is claimed to be a great year of spiritual transformation (or apocalypse). Many esoteric sources interpret the completion of the twelfth B’ak’tun cycle in the Long Count of the Maya calendar (which occurs on December 21 by the most widely held correlation) to mean there will be a major change in world order.

Several experts have predicted a special astrological/astronomical alignment between the Galactic center in the constellation of Sagittarius, the Winter Solstice point, and the open cluster of the Pleiades. Factually, the coincidence of the Winter Solstice point (due to the precession of the Equinoxes) and the galactic center is basically true.

Let me explain.

In the solar system, the planets and the Sun lie roughly within the same level area or plane. This plane is known as the plane of the ecliptic. From our perspective on Earth-looking up at the sky- the ecliptic is the path the Sun takes across the sky over the course of the year. Imagine a strip of sky the sun passes through over the earth. There are also twelve constellations that line the path the sun takes. These constellations are known as the zodiacal constellations. Zodiacal constellations are the signs you are familiar with such as Libra, Pisces, Aries, etc.

You actually determine what your “sign” is by which zodiacal constellation the sun is passing through in its path when you are born. Anyways, annually, the Sun passes through all of the signs or constellations one at a time.  Over time, the Sun’s annual trip through the constellations appears to move very slowly backward by one degree every 72 years or by one constellation approximately every 2,160 years. This backward movement is called “precession”. This movement backwards is due to a slight wobble in the Earth’s axis as it spins, and can be compared to the way a spinning top wobbles as it slows down. Over the course of 25,800 years, a period often called a Great Year; the Sun’s completes a full trip or makes a full backward rotation passing through all the zodiac constellations.

In Western astrological traditions, precession is measured from the March equinox, one of the two points a year where the Sun is exactly halfway between its lowest and highest points in the sky. Presently, the Sun’s March equinox position is in the constellation Pisces and is moving backwards or preceding (making it’s precession) into Aquarius. This signals the end of one astrological age (the Age of Pisces) and the beginning of another (the Age of Aquarius). This movement of the sun backwards into Aquarius will happen as the sun makes it way halfway through the Milky Way (Winter Solstice) and the Mayan calendar marked this significant astrological event in their calendar-December 21, 2012.

The Age of Aquarius is associated with electricity, computers, flight, democracy, freedom, humanitarianism, idealism, modernization, astrology, nervous disorders, rebellion, non-conforming, philanthropy, veracity, perseverance, humanity and irresolution. Many astrologers have marked the coming of the Age of Aquarius through the appearance of multiple of these characteristics in the last few years. We are in the Piscean Age right now and it is much different than Aquarian Age. This could be the transformation the Mayans are talking about.

Piscean Age        

  • Independence
  • What’s in it for me?
  • Duality-right and wrong
  • Machines
  • Competition
  • One leader
  • Motivated by fear
  • Separation
  • Insanity of the ego
  • Focus on differences
  • Hide behind a persona
  • Intellectual
  • Scarcity
  • Dependence on authority
  • Slave to the senses
  • Go and get it
  • Work harder and work smarter

The Aquarian Age symbolizes a big difference in comparison to the Piscean Age

  • Interdependence
  • How can my actions benefit the whole?
  • Unity and oneness
  • Awareness and information
  • Cooperation
  • Many leaders
  • Motivated by the greater good and love
  • Connection/synthesis
  • Focus on uniqueness
  • Integrity
  • Abundance
  • Intuitive
  • Personal responsibility
  • Spirit prevails over the material
  • Sit inside yourself and attract what you need

All these things can be easily seen to be happening in our world slowly but surely. Each age lasts approximately 2,160 years so it may take time for the effects of the Aquarian Age to take hold but we can see how things are already changing slowly but surely. Maybe the Mayans were merely telling us to take notice of the sky and how it effects on us on earth. Either way big changes are happening regardless of 12-21-12. Hopefully for the greater good and a more spiritual way of life.