Buddhist 12 Steps

Buddhist 12 Steps

For those who struggle with the concept of God or a Higher Power, the Buddhist 12 Steps might be the perfect solution. Just like other 12 Step fellowships, Buddhism provides a path to transformation in the form of a veritable blue print for a spiritual life.

Many Buddhists find that it helps them to belong to a Buddhist community as well as a 12 Step community – the two complement each other because both call for a spirituality that is based on a practical philosophy of the “here and now” that leads to higher transformation.

Spirituality Not Dogma

Buddhism points out ways to live an enlightened, spiritual life without necessarily believing in God. For this reason some people do not see Buddhism as a religion in the typical, Western sense. Buddhism, rather, is a path of practice and spiritual development; so that practitioners are able transform their lives. In Buddhism, there is no identified Deity, or God. Buddha, himself, is recognized as a great teacher, but never a god. Buddhism and the Buddhist 12 Steps are meant to lead people to their own Buddhahood, or enlightenment. Enlightenment is the state beyond craving and suffering.

The Buddhist 12 Steps:

Buddhist 12 Steps – Step 1: We admitted our addictive craving of alcohol and recognized its consequences in our lives.

Buddhist 12 Steps – Step 2: Came to believe that a power other than self could restore us to wholeness.

Buddhist 12 Steps – Step 3: Made a decision to go for refuge to this other power as we understood it.

Buddhist 12 Steps – Step 4: Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.

Buddhist 12 Steps – Step 5: Admitted to ourselves and another human being the exact moral nature of our past.

Buddhist 12 Steps – Step 6: Became entirely ready to work at transforming ourselves.

Buddhist 12 Steps – Step 7: With the assistance of others and our own firm resolve, we transformed unskillful aspects of ourselves and cultivated positive ones.

Buddhist 12 Steps – Step 8: Made a list of all persons we had harmed.

Buddhist 12 Steps – Step 9: Made direct amends to such people where possible, except when to do so would injure them or others. In addition, made a conscientious effort to forgive all those who harmed us.

Buddhist 12 Steps – Step 10: Continue to maintain awareness of our actions and motives, and when we acted unskillfully promptly admitted it.

Buddhist 12 Steps – Step 11: Engaged through the practice of meditation to improve our conscious contact with our true selves, and seeking that beyond self. Also used prayer as a means to cultivate positive attitudes and states of mind.

Buddhist 12 Steps – Step 12: Having gained spiritual insight as a result of these steps, we practice these principles in all areas of our lives, and make this message available to others in need of recovery.

 

The Buddhist 12 Steps and the Four Noble Truths

It is also possible to look upon the traditional 12 steps as containing the Four Noble Truths and Eightfold Path of Buddhism:

Step 1 = There is suffering

Step 2 = Suffering is caused by cravings

Step 2There is an escape from cravings

Step 3 = The escape from cravings is the noble eightfold path

**The noble eightfold path contains the rest of the steps:

Step 4 = Right view

Steps 5, 6, and 7 = Right intention

Right speech

Steps 8 and 9 =Right action

Right livelihood

Step 10 = Right effort

Step 11 = Right mindfulness

Step 12 = Right concentration

 

The Buddhist 12 Steps and Buddha, Dharma, and Sangha

Buddha refers to both the historical enlightened person and someone’s own potential Buddhahood. Dharma refers to the teaching and Sangha is the spiritual community. The Buddha can be someone’s concept of their Higher Power and Buddha can also represent a trust and faith in your teachers (such as your Sponsor and sober supports). Dharma is the teachings, which can encompass the 12 Steps as well as the other literature used in a 12 Step program. And Sangha, the spiritual community represents the fellowship.

 

 

Sources:

http://www.sasana.org/

http://www.beliefnet.com/

Holistic Non 12 Step

Holistic Non 12 Step

When it comes to combating addiction and alcoholism there is a myriad of options out there on how to do it and what works best. Really, the point of it all though is to find whatever is going to work for you whatever that is. Many people use a 12 step programs to get sober and overcome their addiction and alcoholism. And other people, well they prefer a different approach and this approach is usually labeled as holistic; holistic non 12 step.

Holistic non 12 step is exactly what it sounds like. It is a program to help individuals who are suffering from an addiction or alcoholism stay sober without the use of a 12 step program such as AA or NA. A holistic approach can be very beneficial for anyone who is dealing with addiction and alcoholism because it focuses on the whole rather than just separate parts of the problem. Holistic literally defines into treating the whole meaning treating the physical, mental and spiritual parts of an individual.

So what can you expect from something that holistic non 12 step that will help you to stay sober? Here are just a few of things:

•An abundance of one-on-one, customized therapy each month

•Treatment of the underlying reasons why you are abusing substances, not just the symptoms of addiction itself

•A variety of holistic methods that provide physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual healing

•No requirement to declare yourself as powerless or incurable

Those are just a few of the things. In more detail, the varieties of holistic methods that provide physical, mental, emotional and spiritual healing are all extremely beneficial. Here are some examples of the holistic methods that a holistic non 12 step approach provides:

Acupuncture- Fine needles are inserted at specific points to stimulate, disperse, and regulate the flow of vital energy, and restore a healthy energy balance. In addition to pain relief, acupuncture is also used to improve well-being and treat acute, chronic, and degenerative conditions in children and adults.

 

Aromatherapy- Using “essential oils” distilled from plants, aromatherapy treats emotional disorders such as stress and anxiety as well as a wide range of other ailments. Oils are massaged into the skin in diluted form, inhaled, or placed in baths. Aromatherapy is often used in conjunction with massage therapy, acupuncture, reflexology, herb ology, chiropractic, and other holistic treatments.

Breath work- It is a simple yet powerful technique for self-exploration and healing, based on combined insights from modern consciousness research, depth psychology and perennial spiritual practices. The method activates non-ordinary states of consciousness which mobilize the spontaneous healing potential of the psyche. Sustained effective breathing, evocative music, focused energy work and mandala drawing are components of this subjective journey.

Colon Therapy- The therapeutic goals of colon therapy are to balance body chemistry, eliminate waste, and restore proper tissue and organ function. Colon therapy releases toxins, cleans the blood, stimulates the immune system, and aids in restoring the pH balance in the body. Colon Therapy, also known as colonics, is believed to relieve a wide range of symptoms related to colon dysfunction.

Chiropractic-The chiropractic views the spine as the backbone of human health: misalignments of the vertebrae caused by poor posture or trauma (such as addiction and alcoholism) cause pressure on the spinal nerve roots, leading to diminished function and illness. Through manipulation or adjustment of the spine, treatment seeks to analyze and correct these misalignments

Not only are those holistic non 12 step methods applied but also counseling and psychotherapy, hypnotherapy, hydrotherapy, massage therapy, native American sweat lodges, naturopathic medicine, Reiki, tai-chi, yoga and vitamin therapies.

Through these different methods the holistic non 12 step approach can be just as effective as the 12 step approach. Holistic non 12 step is all about healing from addiction and alcoholism just without the use of 12 steps.

http://www.altmedworld.net/alternative.htm

 

Holistic Drug Treatment vs. Alternative Drug Treatment

Holistic Drug Treatment vs. Alternative Drug Treatment

 

What is Holistic Drug Treatment?

Holistic drug rehab is centered on the belief that individuals battling addiction are people who need and deserve treatment for their entire being, not just their dependence.

First to know what to look for in a holistic drug rehab center you must know the definition of holistic and what kind of practices are under that definition. Holistic means to treat the whole instead of the parts. Holistic practices are those that treat an entire mind, body and spirit. Knowing this holistic drug rehab centers offer things such as; acupuncture, yoga, meditation, aromatherapy, equine therapy, and tai-chi. All of these are holistic practices because they treat the body’s mental, physical and spiritual functions.

Spirituality plays a role in recovery. Clients often turned to substances in order to fill an empty hole. The temporary effects of being high or drunk can make that feeling go away for a bit, but eventually return. The spiritual component to holistic drug rehabilitation can help manifest in clients a new sense of purpose.

One of the ways that holistic drug treatment facilities attempt to attend to the whole person and to individualize care is by providing such alternative treatments—including acupuncture, energy psychology, equine-assisted therapy, neurofeedback, psychodrama, Reiki, somatic experiencing, and massage therapy.

Often times, holistic drug treatment programs are based on a 12 Step program philosophy, which recognizes the importance of having a spiritual foundation in order to begin recovery from addiction.

Holistic Drug Treatment vs. Alternative Drug Treatment

Although they are used interchangeably, alternative drug treatment typically means drug treatment that is wholly different from other modalities of addiction treatment. Holistic programs may offer “alternative” medicine and techniques such as yoga, meditation, acupuncture, and so on. Alternative drug treatment does not promote the 12 Step program philosophies, which recognizes addiction as a combination of physical allergy, mental obsession, and spiritual malady. Alternative drug treatment takes a different approach and seemingly identifies only one or two of these on which to focus.

For example, Narconon is an alternative drug treatment program that consists of six elements: exercise, sauna, supplements, sufficient liquids, regular diet with fresh vegetables, and adequate sleep. It employs courses or “training routines” (TRs) that supposedly rehabilitate drug abusers.

Another alternative drug treatment facility boasts a program of moderation. The approach is to teach clients how to acquire feelings of joy or satisfaction from the more typical activities of life. The goal is not necessarily to have clients stop their drug(s) of choice and/or addictive behavior 100% as is the approach of the 12 Steps and those who treat addiction only as a brain disease.

 

Its program states that it is unlike 12 Step recovery because it offers a wide range of “goal options” specific to the addictive behavior. Each goal requires a different strategy and results in a different outcome regarding the substance or behavior of your concern, from complete abstinence to solely abstinent from the drug(s) of choice, to moderation of the “problem” drug, to reduction of problem behavior to a “less harmful state.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:

http://www.psychologytoday.com

http://addictionalternatives.com

www.wikipedia.org